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Apr 25, 2019
After a single case in Delaware last year of a 'kissing bug' last summer, the CDC is concerned that the disease that brings with it could affect the country this summer due to climate change. The scientific name for the bug is Triatoma sanguisuga, a bug that transmits Chagas disease; the disease can affect the heart and cause gastrointestinal disorders. Historically, Chagas disease is not common in the US, but it's more widespread in rural areas of Latin America. The National Health Department advises people not to kill the bug if they see it, but to put it in a container and fill it with rubbing alcohol or cold water.
Apr 25, 2019
According to the Global State of Emotions report, people in different countries have different levels of emotions regarding their wellbeing. Anger, sadness, and fear were shown to be the highest last year, breaking 2017's record. More than 150,000 interviews were held in 140 countries to oversee the emotional state of the population; it was found the world's most negative country is Chad in Africa. The levels of poverty and lack of essential services contributed to the result. It was also shown that while negative emotions were on the rise, Latin America showed to be the most positive lot despite having the highest levels of violence. Other countries in Asia and Europe showed to have a high level of positivity.
Apr 25, 2019
The director of UNICEF Henrietta Fore has released a statement saying that over 167 million children around the world are not getting the vaccination against measles, for an average of 20 million every year. The total number of cases has significantly risen in the last seven years; countries that had eradicated the virus have been more affected by the increase. Misinformation brought by activist groups against vaccines, poor healthcare and low access to vaccines are the most significant obstacles to tackle the crisis. The organization is encouraging more vaccine coverage in the affected countries and the improvement of healthcare systems to combat the ongoing outbreaks and prevent others in the future.
Apr 25, 2019
A new invention by the University of California can read a person's tongue, voice box, lips, and jaw movements through the brain's signal of command and make out words. A computing system takes care of deciphering the movements to predict the sounds the would form and create synthesized speech. Researchers began this experiment to help people who lost the ability to speak through disease or injury; people with strokes won't be able to use it since brain activity is necessary for the machine to work. Other uses for the machine could be reading thoughts to materialize them although researchers say that possibility is still too far in the future.
Apr 25, 2019
The CDC has released a statement saying that a nurse is responsible for the hepatitis C outbreak at a hospital in Washington. It was found that the nurse had taken drugs such as opioids, sedatives and antihistamines to use them on herself first to then use it on the patients. A total of 12 patients were discovered to have the disease with the same gene trace as the nurse. The name of the nurse and the hospital was not provided in the report, but the Good Samaritan Hospital addressed the issue and took responsibility for the incident. Hepatitis C is a disease that affects the liver and can lead to death if left untreated.
Apr 25, 2019
According to a study from the University of Dusseldorf, Germany, most of the restaurant workers don't know general information about allergens and their effect on allergic customers. Researchers went to 295 restaurants to quiz waiters and kitchen staff to check their knowledge and found only 30% of the staff knew the most common allergens: milk, fish, and eggs. The people who performed the study were shocked by the result since the staff works daily with food and consumers don't have the full information on allergies. It was also found that employees only get training in hygiene, not allergens. Restaurant managers are encouraged to inform their workers about the consequences misinformation could have.
Apr 25, 2019
Couples who are looking to have a baby often blame the woman when it comes to fertility problems. However, a doctor from the Center of Male Reproductive Health at RMA says that males have to do with 40% to 50% of the problem. Factors such as obesity, exercise, alcohol, and drug use can contribute to the health of the sperm. Doctors often recommend both the man and woman to go to consultation three months prior to procreating; since it is necessary to check the sperm count, sperm abnormalities and testosterone levels. Having bad health at the time of conceiving can also affect the baby and its development after birth.
Apr 25, 2019
The FBI is investigating the possible illegal sharing of intellectual property from medical centers in the US. The cancer center at the University of Texas has fired and prosecuted faculty members after discovering they had gotten payments from foreign governments to leak information about medical discoveries or advancements. The center is working along with the FBI to track the rest of the members to stop the breaches from happening. This raises new tensions among the medicine community as people who are from Chinese descent are facing exclusion and scrutiny for an isolated event. Foreign influence in the US could put the country's property into jeopardy.
Apr 25, 2019
The precut melons from a company called Caito Food have infected 117 people with Salmonella in 10 states, says the CDC. There have been 32 people hospitalized, with ages ranging from 1 to 98 years old. The disease can cause diarrhea, fever, and stomachaches. The investigation by the FDA is still ongoing as some of the tainted products haven't been identified. Some of the contaminated products by Caito Food are precut melon, honeydew, cantaloupe, and fruit assortments. These products were found is chain grocery stores like Whole Foods and Walmart. The FDA recommends consumers to throw out the fruit if they are not sure about its origin.
Apr 25, 2019
An Arab woman woke up in a hospital saying her son's name who she had saved in a car accident that left her in a 27-year-old coma. The car she was in with her son and brother-in-law was hit by a bus in 1991; she managed to protect her then 4-year-old, and went unconscious after the accident, leading doctors to determine she was in a vegetative state. Her son says that an argument in her hospital room was what sparked his mother to wake up and say his name. She is now undergoing physical therapy after years of not moving her legs; she is capable of holding a short conversation but has yet to improve.
Apr 24, 2019
Lego has released their Braille brick collection for blind or visually impaired people after two charity foundations from Brazil and Denmark proposed the idea. A final set of 250 pieces will be compatible with the rest of Lego sets; the parts will have the complete Braille alphabet and the numbers from 0 to 9 along with math symbols. Lego has made this decision due to the high rate of visually impaired children who aren't learning Braille due to the implementation of audiobooks and specialized programs for computers. Both the charity foundations and the company expect this new invention to spark more interest and raise awareness for the Braille alphabet and its importance.
Apr 24, 2019
The CDC has stated that the ongoing measles outbreak in the US is the biggest since its eradication in 2000 with 681 cases reported; the previous number was of 667. The outbreak covers 22 states with a high chance of spreading to others. The focus for the disease is in communities where the anti-vax movement is strong, making nearby locations susceptible to contracting the disease. Doctors are restating the effectiveness of the vaccine where one dose is 93% effective and a second dose is 97% effective. Since the creation of the vaccine, the number of cases dropped from millions to only tens of cases.
Apr 24, 2019
The pharmaceutical company Pharma Purdue is under legal scrutiny after several City and State attorneys have filed lawsuits against it after their alleged efforts to increase opioids sales. Following the 1,000 casualties caused by the drugs in Connecticut, the State attorney has stated that the owners of the company have transferred money between their properties to file for bankruptcy and make it impossible to pay compensation. Purdue Pharma has since denied any allegations against them, blaming the smuggling of fentanyl and heroin from Mexico and China for the deaths instead. Executives state that the opioid crisis should be publicly addressed and solved by the government.
Apr 24, 2019
A study by the University of Iowa showed that people who frequently skipped breakfast were at a greater risk of having an early death due to stroke or heart-related diseases. The study took into account different factors like lifestyle, diet, body mass index and race to determine the chances of suffering an early death. The sample of the study consisted of 6,550 individuals that were asked how often they skipped breakfast. Out of the lot, 5.1% never ate breakfast, 10.9% rarely, 25% on some days and 59% always. The people who never ate breakfast had an 87% higher chance of developing heart disease or having a stroke.
Apr 24, 2019
A new treatment for Parkinson developed by doctors at the Lawson Health Research Institute in Canada has sparked new hope for people who are not able to walk due to the progress of the disease. The treatment was developed starting from the doctors' belief that the problem lied on the disrupted from the brain to the legs and vice versa, so they created an implant to increase the signal that reaches the brain to complete the motion. After trials, the implant showed to be a long-lasting solution, helping patients who could only move with a wheelchair. Future treatments could drastically improve the lives of millions of patients around the world.
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